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Pitchfork Music Festival Is Officially Cancelled

By Colby Smith

Pitchfork Music Festival Is Officially Cancelled

Ticket holders will receive emails with information regarding refunds.

Earlier today, the organizers behind Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago announced that it would be cancelled due to coronavirus.

The festival was scheduled for July 17-19 in Chicago’s Union Park, featuring headliners: Yeah Yeah Yeahs, The National, and Run the Jewels.

Angel Olson, Big Theif, Sharon Von Etten, Deafheaven, Danny Brown, Kim Gordon, Thundercat, SOPHIE, and Phoebe Bridgers were also scheduled to perform.

Pitchfork made the announcement on their website:

“We’re heartbroken to announce the cancellation of Pitchfork Music Festival 2020, due to COVID-19. Ticketholders will be contacted directly via email with full refund options; thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as we work through all of this.”

Their announcement comes on the heels of JB Pritzker’s 5-phase plan to re-open Illinois. According to his plan, festivals, conferences, and large gatherings over 50 people will not take place unless a viable vaccine is produced, or, if the number of cases remains at zero for an extended period of time.

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“It can be pretty daunting to think about the future of live music right now, but know that we are fully committed to bringing Pitchfork Music Festival back in 2021, if the public health situation allows for it. In the meantime, we urge everyone to follow local health department guidelines. We are in this together, and, if we all do our part, we’ll celebrate next year in person,” Pitchfork wrote.

Pitchfork was one of the largest music festivals slated for Chicago this summer, and is the latest to be cancelled. JB Pritzker had previously warned that all summer festivals would face the same fate unless a vaccine were produced.

At this moment, there are still many festivals planned for this summer in Chicago, including Lollapalooza and Taste of Chicago — two of the city’s biggest.

“In the meantime, we have plans for more livestreams, and more ways to use the full weight of Pitchfork to support musicians and the community around our festival. We’re not going anywhere—stay tuned, stay positive, and see you soon,” Pitchfork wrote.

[Featured image: @aranxa_esteve]