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Watch An Incredible Side-By-Side Comparison Of Chicago 72 Years Apart

Colby Smith Colby Smith

Watch An Incredible Side-By-Side Comparison Of Chicago 72 Years Apart

Take a trip in the time machine to see what Chicago looked like 77 years ago!

Ever wondered what Chicago looked like when your grandparents were growing up? Now you can see the Chicago of the ’40s and witness how the city has grown!

The original footage was part of a collection uncovered by a film colorist named, Jeff Altman. Altman was at an estate sale in South Side in 2013, when he found a canister labeled “Chicago: Print One”.

The film canister contained an educational documentary about the city in 1944. Altman, took it upon himself to process and colorize the film’s negatives, revealing a unique glimpse into the Chicago of yesteryear.

Youtuber, Chicago Aussie, took the colorized film from the documentary and intercut it with modern-day footage for a spectacular look into how the city has evolved over the years.

With its original narration from radio announcer, Johnnie Neblett, and old-timey score, the film depicts the Chicago of 1944 as a thriving city, highlighting its wonderful landmarks, architectural feats, and bustling city streets.

It opens with a crackling shot of Buckingham Fountain, and with the Aussie’s interpolation, pans as the metropolis of present-day Chicago fills the backdrop.

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Even back then, as the narrator remarks, the city skyline was a famous accomplishment:

“Chicago city skyline: an imposing spectacle; soaring towers, tall, proud structures overlooking Grant Park and the waterfront,” he says as the screen is interposed with modern-day footage of even taller skyscrapers — revealing the growth and boom of the city.

The film proceeds with footage of Michigan Boulevard, the Wrigley Building, Tribune Tower, the Chicago Water Tower, the public library, Uptown Theatre, State Street, and Randolph Street.

At the end of the film, the narrator makes the closing remark:

“Chicago, a city of opportunity; progressive in spirit, confident of a glorious future.”

[Featured image source: video still]